The Elusive ‘Culture of Assessment’

Always elusive, never too far away, the ‘Culture of Assessment’ is a general idea that can be tough to define, and even tougher to establish. After attending the AACP (American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy) Annual Meeting this week, I had an interesting conversation with our newly established Interim-Dean, Dr. S. William Zito. As we often do, we began to brainstorm new ways to get faculty on board, and establish the culture of assessment within our institution. He then said something that was outside the box, and made me really think: “Maybe the answer is to stop trying to make the College fit the culture, but instead make the culture fit the College.”

Wow. A simple idea, but one that never really occurred to me. Obviously, the challenge begins with defining this culture, or what we’d really like it to be. The next step becomes trying to figure out what the best way is to mould the culture to fit our faculty and College as a whole. This is our challenge, and hopefully we can make some major progress in the coming year. Either way, if we don’t figure out the best way to get the culture flourishing, assessment will continue to be an uphill battle for us, and anyone else in the same boat.

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1 Comment

Filed under Culture

One response to “The Elusive ‘Culture of Assessment’

  1. Gina LaPan

    The notion of a “Culture of Assessment” can be very difficult to wrap one’s mind around and concisely define then make certain it is implemented. The culture must be personalized and tailored to meet the needs of a particular College rather than a broad goal that can be implemented anywhere. It is likely that what may be an ideal “culture of assessment” in a textbook may not be what is right for a particular College.

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